All posts by eontbird

The Field Identification of the “Hooded” Juncos

The Field Identification of the “Hooded” Juncos is officially a work-in-progress. I will cover four subspecies in the document; Slate-colored, Cassiar, Oregon (J. h. montaus as well as J. h. shufeldti) and Pink-sided. I managed to glean all my previous references, as well as gather photos that were previously sent by Ontario birders. This will be self-published and self-edited work, completely open to scrutiny/improvement upon completion. Any additional information/corrections made, will result in an updated PDF. In the meantime, if you have any photos of “hooded” juncos (Cassiar or Oregon…or even a brownish Slate-colored), I’d love to review them and possibly include them in the article! Photos can be sent to eontbird@gmail.com. Please include the date of the observation and the city/town, as well as the county, within Ontario. I think that’s all for now…Good birding.

Oregon Dark-eyed Junco     (Junco hyemalis montanus) and (Junco hyemalis shufeldtiJ. h. montanus and J. h. shufeldti

Slate-colored Dark-eyed Junco (Junco hyemalis hyemalis)

Pink-sided Dark-eyed Junco   (Junco hyemalis mearnsi)

Cassiar Dark-eyed Junco     (Junco hyemalis cismonatnus)

 

Fall Warbler Migration Guide

The following warbler graphs are organized from early season to late season. Note that many species share the same peak dates (mid to late August). All eastern Ontario counties are included in the study area. The study period is from 1990-2017 (I made these outputs in 2017).

Figure 1: Our earliest season warbler, the Yellow Warbler, paired with other abundant, early August species. YEWA, BAWW, AMRE, and CSWA. Fall passage in frequency, eastern Ontario, 1990-2016.

Figure 2: Common Yellowthroat and American Redstart are very similar in frequency (shown), totals, and migration timing. Fall passage in totals, eastern Ontario, 1990-2016.

Figure 3: Cape May and Blackburnian are very similar in frequency, totals (shown), and migration timing. Fall passage in totals, eastern Ontario, 1990-2016.

Figure 4: Golden-winged, Blue-winged, and Brewster’s (hybrid). Not at all typical finds during fall migration! Fall passage in totals, eastern Ontario, 1990-2016.

Figure 5: Mourning Warbler & Canada Warbler. Both are highly sought-after species, and, rightly so! Mourning, in particular, is a prize find. Fall passage in totals, eastern Ontario, 1990-2016.

Figure 6: Ovenbird & Northern Waterthrush; skulkers of the underbrush. Fall passage in totals eastern Ontario. 1990-2016.

Figure 7: Nashville & Tennessee warblers. Fall passage in frequency, eastern Ontario. 1990-2016.

Figure 8: Blackpoll & Bay-breasted warblers. For information on how to separate these two look-a like’s, please see https://eontbird.ca/?p=873. Fall passage in frequency, eastern Ontario. 1990-2016.

Figure 9: The Heavyweight Champion of the Warblers, the Connecticut Warbler. The best time to look for this species is from the last few days of August through to the beginning of the second week of September. Very early September, in particular, is prime COWA season. Fall passage in totals, eastern Ontario. 1990-2016.

Figure 10: Northern Parula & Magnolia Warbler. Fall passage in frequency, eastern Ontario. 1990-2016.

Figure 11: Black-throated Green and Black-throated Blue Warbler. Fall passage in frequency, eastern Ontario. 1990-2016.

Figure 12: Palm Warbler. Fall passage in frequency, eastern Ontario. 1990-2016.

Figure 13: Pine Warbler. Fall passage in frequency, eastern Ontario. 1990-2016.

Figure 14: Wilson’s Warbler. Fall passage in frequency, eastern Ontario. 1990-2016.

Figure 15: Orange-crowned Warbler. A highly sought-after and characteristically late-season migrant. Fall passage in frequency, eastern Ontario. 1990-2016.

Figure 16: Yellow-rumped Warbler. Fall passage in frequency, eastern Ontario. 1990-2016.